Archiv für den Monat: August 2017

[Report] Who owns the flights market in search?

Which brands dominate the US flights market in search?

A new report by Pi Datametrics has analyzed the entire US flights market to discover the most organically valuable search themes and players with the greatest share of voice across the market.

The search data was collected from across Google US with a view to identifying the search terms with the most commercial opportunity over the last four years, and trended to reveal demand peaks and declines across the travel industry.

‘International‘ flights: Trended search themes | May 2016 – May 2017

Image source: Pi Datametrics Market Intelligence

So what does the data show, and what can marketers learn from it about the state of the flights market?

The difference between organic value and search volume

Trended search volume data is a strong indication of research and demand phases, but to determine when a search is most likely to actually convert, Pi has applied their proprietary Organic Value Score.

Search volume alone doesn’t always indicate value. Pi’s Organic Value Score averages out all of the metrics critical to conversion – including adword data – to reflect the true value of individual search terms, and their overarching search themes.

Looking at the search volume graph (above) in isolation, ‘Latin America & Caribbean‘ appears to be the one of the most important search themes to focus strategy on within the ‘International flights‘ market.

But, if we overlay commercial value, the data tells a slightly different story. ‘Latin America & Caribbean‘ devalues significantly, while ‘Europe & Middle East‘ retains its competitive edge.

Share of voice: Top sites across the entire ‘Flights‘ market

Date: 7th June 2017 | Top 20 sites

Image source: Pi Datametrics Market Intelligence

Using a datapool of the most valuable ‘International‘ and ‘Domestic‘ search terms, Pi generated a vast snapshot of the entire US ‘Flights‘ market (12,286 sites), to reveal the players dominating the industry.

Kayak own the US ‘Flights‘ market

Kayak perform best both internationally and domestically, closely followed by Tripadvisor – which has recently transformed into an integrated review / booking site.

Here are just a few key insights:

  • The top 3 performers own 57% of the entire ‘Flights‘ category.
  • All ‘Others‘ beyond the top 20 own 10.1% of the ‘Flights‘ market. Kayak, alone, owns more than double this.
  • The top 11 performers consist of online travel agencies, aggregators or integrated review and booking sites. These sites own 86% of the entire market.
  • An airline doesn’t appear until position 11, and only owns 0.6% of the category.

Image source: Pi Datametrics Market Intelligence

Which airline groups own the entire ‘Flights‘ category?

  • Priceline Group owns 33.5% of the entire market – that’s four times more share than the entire remaining market, beyond the top 20
  • Expedia Inc owns 25.6% of the entire market
  • All ‘Others‘, beyond the top 20, own a tiny 7.7% of the market
  • Airline providers can use this market share data to establish the best aggregators to resell their ‘Flights‘

When combined, Expedia Inc and Priceline Group own nearly 60% of the entire US ‘Flights‘ market. This is astronomical, and has created an ‘illusion of choice‘ across the digital travel landscape.

  • Priceline is the 6th largest internet company by revenue ($10.64bn USD).
  • Expedia is the world’s 10th largest internet company by revenue ($8.77bn USD).

These revenue statistics just prove the success of their digital duopoly.

What can marketers and SEOs in the travel industry learn from the data about the most valuable search terms? Knowing their most valuable content gives businesses the foresight to dictate strategy.

From Pi’s trend chart, we can see that Europe and Middle Eastern flights have the highest Organic Value across the US ‘International flights‘ market.

Aggregators, airlines and integrated booking sites can use this data to plan marketing activity around the most valuable flights.

Why is the online flights market so heavily dominated by just two companies?

Priceline group and Expedia own significant search real estate, and dominate the flights industry.

We can’t know exactly how these groups achieve their success, but we can presume that each brand prioritizes search throughout the business.

What’s more, these groups have an array of interrelated digital assets, which provide greater opportunity for comprehensive link infrastructures. This would only serve to boost their presence across the search landscape.

Based on the data, we can also see that online travel agencies, aggregators and booking sites decisively outrank airlines themselves in almost all cases. So why is this?

Based on their business offering, aggregators and OTAs offer a variety of content covering all areas of the flights market.

As direct providers, airlines may have less opportunity to match this offering, which could in turn impede market share.

The full report can be downloaded from the Pi Datametrics website.

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

Google Analytics: Misunderstandings that hold marketers back

Google Analytics (GA) has done more than any other platform to bring the practice of data analytics to the center of organizations.

By offering a free-to-use, intuitive solution to businesses of any size, it has offered the promise of full transparency into customer behavior.

Moreover, as part of the broader marketing analytics movement, it has helped shape the language we use daily. Our handy guide explains some of the most frequently heard, but at time confusing, terms GA has brought into everyday parlance in the marketing world.

Pitch decks and strategy sessions abound with references to “data-driven decisions” nowadays, which is a healthy trend for businesses overall. Beyond the buzzword status this phrase has attained, it is true that businesses that integrate analytics into the decision-making process simply get better results.

Google reports that business leaders are more than twice as likely to act on insights taken from analytics:

As Google continues to improve its offering, with Optimize and Data Studio available to everyone, and an ever more impressive list of paid products via the Analytics 360 suite, marketers need to understand the data in front of them.

Unfortunately, there are some common misunderstandings of how Google collects, configures, processes, and reports data.

The below are some of the commonly misunderstood metrics and features within the core Google Analytics interface.

By avoiding these pitfalls, you will enable better decisions based on data you can trust.

Bounce rate

What is it?

Bounce rate is a simple, useful metric that is triggered when a user has a single-page session on a website. That is to say, they entered on one URL and left the site from the same URL, without interacting with that page or visiting any others on the site.

It is calculated as a percentage, by dividing the aggregate number of single-page sessions by the total number of entries to that page. Bounce rate can also be shown on a site-wide level to give an overview of how well content is performing.

As such, it makes for a handy heuristic when we want to glean some quick insights into whether our customers like a page or not. The assumption is that a high bounce rate is reflective of a poorly performing page, as its contents have evidently not encouraged a reader to explore the site further.

Why is it misunderstood?

Bounce rate is at times both misunderstood and misinterpreted.

A ‘bounce‘ occurs when a user views one page on a site and a single request is sent to the Analytics server. Therefore, we can say that Google uses the quantity of engagement hits to classify a bounced session. One request = bounced; more than one request to the server = not bounced.

This can be problematic, given that any interaction will preclude that session from counting as a bounce. Some pages contain auto-play videos, for example. If the start of a video is tracked as an event, this will trigger an engagement hit. Even if the user exits the page immediately, they will still not be counted as a bounced visit.

Equally, a user may visit the page, find the exact information they wanted (a phone number or address, for example), and then carry out their next engagement with the brand offline. Their session could be timed out (this happens by default after 30 minutes on GA and then restarts), before they engage further with the site. In either example, this will be counted as a bounced visit.

That has an impact on the Average Time on Page calculations, of course. A bounced visit has a duration of zero, as Google calculates this based on the time between visiting one page and the next – meaning that single-page visits, and the last page in any given session, will have zero Time on Page.

Advances in user-based tracking (as opposed to cookie-based) and integration with offline data sources provide cause for optimism; but for now, most businesses using GA will see a bounce rate metric that is not wholly accurate.

All of this should start to reveal why and how bounce rate can be misinterpreted.

First of all, a high bounce rate not always a problem. Often, users find what they want by viewing one page and this could actually be a sign of a high-performing page. This occurs when people want very specific information, but can also occur when they visit a site to read a blog post.

Moreover, a very low bounce rate does not necessarily mean a page is performing well. It may suggest that users have to dig deeper to get the information they want, or that they quickly skim the page and move on to other content.

With the growing impact of RankBrain, SEOs will understandably view bounce rate as a potential ranking factor. However, it has to be placed in a much wider context before we can assume it has a positive or negative impact on rankings.

How can marketers avoid this?

Marketers should never view bounce rate as a measure of page quality in isolation. There really is no such thing as a ‘good‘ or ‘bad‘ bounce rate in a universal sense, but when combined with other metrics we can get a clearer sense of whether a page is doing its job well.

Tools like Scroll Depth are great for this, as they allow us to see in more detail how a consumer has interacted with our content.

We can also make use of Google Tag Manager to adapt the parameters for bounce rate and state, for example, that any user that spends longer than 30 seconds on the page should be discounted as a bounce. This is useful for publishers who tend to receive a lot of traffic from people who read one post and then go elsewhere.

This is commonly known as ‘adjusted bounce rate‘ and it helps marketers get a more accurate view of content interactions. Glenn Gabe wrote a tutorial for Search Engine Watch on how to implement this: How to implement Adjusted Bounce Rate (ABR) via Google Tag Manager.

Bounce rate can be a very useful metric, but it needs a bit of tweaking for each site before it is truly fit for purpose.

Channel groupings

What is it?

Channels are sources of traffic and they reflect the ways that users find your website. As a result, this is one of the first areas marketers will check in their GA dashboard to evaluate the performance of their different activities.

There are many ways that people can find websites, so we tend to group these channels together to provide a simpler overview of traffic.

Google provides default channel groupings out of the box, which will typically look as follows:

You can find this by navigating this path: Admin > Channel Settings > Channel Grouping.

Anything that sits outside of these sources will fall into the disconcertingly vague ‘(Other)‘ bucket.

From Google’s perspective, this is a reasonably accurate portrayal of the state of affairs for most websites. However, this is applied with broad brush strokes out of necessity and it shapes how marketers interpret very valuable data.

Why is it misunderstood?

Default channel groupings are often misunderstood in the sense that they are taken as the best solution without conducting further investigation.

Vague classifications like ‘Social‘ and ‘Referral‘ ignore the varying purposes of the media that fall under these umbrellas. In the case of the former, we would at the very least want to split out our paid and organic social media efforts and treat them separately.

We want channel groupings to provide a general overview, but perhaps it needn’t be quite so general.

Leaving these groupings as they are has a significant impact, particularly when it comes to the eternal riddle of channel attribution. If we want to understand which channels have contributed to conversions, we need to have our channels correctly defined as a basic starting point.

How can marketers avoid this?

Make use of custom channel groupings that accurately reflect your marketing activities and the experience your consumers will have with your brand online. It is often helpful to group campaigns by their purpose; prospecting and remarketing, for example.

Custom channel groupings are a great option because they alter the display of data, rather than how it is filtered. You can modify the default channel groupings if you feel confident about the changes you plan to make, but this will permanently affect how data is processed in your account. Always add a new view to test these updates before committing them to your main account dashboard.

For most, custom channel groupings will be more than sufficient.

Through the use of regular expressions (known commonly as regex), marketers can set up new rules. Regex is not a particularly complex language to learn and follows a clear logic, but it does take a little bit of getting used to. You can find a great introductory guide to regex expressions here. These rules will allow you to create new channels or alter the pre-defined groupings Google provides.

Your new channel groupings will be applied to historical data, so you can easily assess the difference they make. These alterations will prove especially invaluable when you compare attribution models within GA.

Custom Segments

What are they?

The array of segmentation options available is undoubtedly one of Google Analytics‘ most powerful advantages. Customer segments allow us to view very specific behavioral patterns across demographics, territories and devices, among many others. We can also import segments created by other users, so there is a truly vast selection of options at our disposal.

By clicking on ‘+ New Segment‘ within your GA reports, you will be taken to the Segment Builder interface:

Google provides a very handy preview tool that shows us what percentage of our audience is included under the terms we are in the process of defining. This will always begin at 100% and decrease as our rules start to hone in on particular metrics and/or dimensions:

This is where it starts to get tricky, as the segment builder can start to produce unexpected results. A seemingly sound set of rules can return a preview of 0% of total users, much to the marketer’s chagrin.

Why are they misunderstood?

The underlying logic in how Google processes and interprets data can be complex, even inconsistent at times.

When we set up a set of rules, they will be treated sequentially. A session will need to pass the first condition in order to reach the second round, and so on. We therefore need to consider very carefully how we want our experiments to run if we want them to be sound.

To take a working example, if I want to see how many sessions have included a visit to my homepage and to my blog, I can set up an advanced condition to cover this. I filter by sessions and include a condition for Page exactly matching the blog URL and Page exactly matching the homepage:

This creates what seems like a valid segment in the preview.

Logically, I should be able to take this up one level to see what proportion of users meet these conditions. Within the GA hierarchy, users are a superset of sessions, which are in turn a superset of hits.

However, this is not how things play out in reality. Just by switching the filter from ‘Sessions‘ to ‘Users‘, the segment is rendered invalid:

Why does this occur?

Google uses a different logic to calculate each, which can of course be quite confusing.

In the former example, Google’s logic allowed room for interpretation, so the AND condition loosely meant that a session could include visits to each page at different times. As such, some sessions meet the requisite conditions.

In the latter example, the AND rule means that a user must meet both conditions simultaneously to be included. This is impossible, as they cannot be on two pages at once.

We can still arrive at the same results, but we cannot do so using the AND condition. By removing the second condition and adding a new filter in its place, we can see the same results for Users that we received for Sessions:

In other words, we need to be very specific about what exactly we mean if we want accurate results from segments created for users, but not quite so explicit with sessions.

It is better to err on the safe side overall, as the logic employed for Users was rolled out more recently and it is here to stay. The complexity is multiplied when a segment contains filters for users and for sessions, so it is essential to maintain some consistency in how you set these up.

How can marketers avoid this?

By understanding the hierarchy of User – Session – Hit, we can start to unpick Google’s inner workings. If we can grasp this idea, it is possible to debug custom segments that don’t work as expected.

The same idea applies to metrics and dimensions too, where some pairings logically cannot be met within the same segment. Google provides a very comprehensive view of which pairings will and will not work together which is worth checking out.

Although it does involve quite a bit of trial and error at first, custom segments are worth the effort and remain one of the most powerful tools at the analyst’s disposal.

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

Give Influencer Content Programs a Promotional Edge with Digital Advertising

It happens almost every single time. I’m finally settling in to stream a few episodes before I go to bed for the day. I fire up the old Netflix machine and there it is… options… lots of them.

There are shows I’ve seen before that I might want to watch again. Genres that I’m interested in. Highly rated shows. Maybe I watch one of those trending shows that everyone is talking about? I mean I’ve never seen that Making a Murderer show… did I miss out on that one? My mind continues to jump around with the unlimited options in front of me.

When you have virtually unlimited options in front of you it’s almost impossible to make a choice. This is probably why I’ve watched the American version of the Office about one million times (either that or it’s a really good show).

As marketers we consistently run into situations like this. We are asked to promote a product or a service or a piece of content and when we sit down at our desk we are hit with so many options. We have to choose the right channel, the right audience, the right messaging, the right offer, the right image, the right… Anyone else getting cold sweats just thinking about this?

I want to help you with this problem. Specifically as it relates to influencer content (because that presents a whole new set of challenges that need to be addressed).

Promoting Influencer Content With Digital Advertising

Why focus on influencer marketing? In my opinion influencer marketing is one of the most challenging thing to promote with paid digital advertising. Many people look at influencer marketing and content marketing in general as some magical piece of content that, when published, turns prospects into customers in a completely organic way.

In reality, simply creating great influencer content is not enough. Right now, as I write this, there are over one billion websites (in fact the number grew by about 500 in the time it took me to finish that sentence).

So what does that mean? In very broad and simple terms you aren’t the only one that has to make a lot of choices. So when it comes to influencer content you have to help your audience find it and help them choose it.

5 Steps to Promoting Influence Content with Digital Advertising

The 5 steps below will help you successfully promote your influencer content with digital advertising in a way that attracts and entices your target audience.

Step 1. Change How You Think About Influencer Content

Often marketers don’t change their approach to promotion when deploying an influencer driven content campaign. Instead of thinking of your influencer content as a part of your standard marketing mix think of it as a product.

This is really important. You are not promoting content, you’re not boosting a post, you are selling influencer content. That is your job.

Step 2. Know Your Audience

It seems simple, but is often overlooked. But did you know that now you can really know your audience. For example, if you are using Twitter you can gather awesome insights with Twitter Analytics.

I mean… take a look at this.

The top lifestyle type in my organic audience is “Online Buyers.” I can make assumptions from this. For example, one thing that is often debated is how much info do I ask a prospect to give in exchange for a gated asset? Well an online buyer is comfortable giving over name, phone number, address, credit card info, and more in exchange for goods.

This information can help you determine what to “charge” or how much information you should ask for in exchange for content.

You can gather similar information using tools such as Google Analytics Demographics and Interests and the Facebook Audience Insights tool.

Step 3. Segment Your Audience

Knowing your audience is important. Segmenting your audience is even more essential.

Don’t make the mistake of lumping everyone together into one audience when promoting your influencer driven content. While this tactic may be necessary if you are working with a really small audience, a larger audience that you can segment will allow you to tailor your message to a smaller, specific group of people.

For example, let’s say that you have created influencer content to target HR professionals. It’s possible that you could segment that audience by tenure in the HR industry.

With an audience like this you could tailor your call to action like so.

  • Tenure of 0-5 years – Jumpstart your HR career with….
  • Tenure of 5-15 years – Bring your HR career to the next level with…
  • Tenure of 15+ years – Learn from the top HR professionals…

Segmenting your audience can help you tailor your sales pitch. Remember, you are selling your content not promoting it.

Step 4. Challenge Your Assumptions

What’s the one thing I have heard more than anything else when it comes to promoting B2B influencer content with digital media? Give up? It’s this, “we are a B2B company so we only want to promote this on LinkedIn.

Well first of all, we are selling the content not promoting it. Second of all, you don’t think those same professionals have a Facebook account?

Facebook is on pace to hit 2 billion users. I’m willing to guess that some of those 2 billion users are in the market for B2B goods and services.

Challenging your assumptions has it’s rewards. Currently I am running a campaign for a B2B company and the results look like this…

Challenging assumptions and running a campaign on Twitter was a great bet!

Step 5. Don’t Fall in Love With Your Bets

It’s bound to happen. You’ll do all of the tips above. You’ll create a segmented audience on a social network that sits outside of your assumptions. You’ll create tailored calls to action and you’ll fall in love.

Then it happens… nothing happens… it fails.

When it fails, one of two things normally happen.

  1. Marketers ignore the failure in disbelief
  2. Marketers say, “just give it more time. One more conversion will make this look better.”

Neither of these are going to change anything. In this situation only one thing will work.

Make some changes.

Change your ad copy. Broaden your audience. Change your bids. Try to identify why it isn’t working and fix it.

The Keys to Promoting Influencer Content With Paid Digital Advertising

So there you have it, 5 keys to promoting content with digital advertising. Below is a quick recap that you can use of a checklist of sorts to begin guiding your influencer content and digital advertising journey:

  1. Remember you’re selling your content not promoting it.
  2. Know your audience. Use tools to understand their online behavior.
  3. Segment your audience. Tailor your message in a way that speaks to the individuals in your audience.
  4. Challenge your assumptions. Try something new. Run tests.
  5. Don’t fall in love. Make changes quickly and don’t wait for a campaign to turn into what you want it to be.

I know you have over a billion options to choose from when it comes to internet content. Thanks for choosing this piece. I’d love to hear about any time you challenged an assumption and won or when you fell in love with a campaign. Feel free to share your insights in the comments below.


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Give Influencer Content Programs a Promotional Edge with Digital Advertising | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Give Influencer Content Programs a Promotional Edge with Digital Advertising appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Source:: toprankblog.com

The 10 most common WordPress SEO challenges and how to solve them

If you’re new to the business of SEO and are just figuring out how to optimize your WordPress site for search, navigating the landscape of SEO can seem like a nightmare.

You’ll have seen a thousand different articles on SEO: on-page optimization tips, off-page optimization tips, SEO basics, email marketing tips, etc. online and implemented them – only to see them fail, or worse, backfire.

Don’t worry, you’re not alone. SEO can be tricky, and there is always a huge scope for overdoing or underdoing things. While I can’t fully solve this problem for you, I’ll make an attempt to round up the most commonly faced SEO challenges with WordPress so that you can look into your site and make some amends.

The important thing to understand here is that the same factors can prove to be a boon as well as a challenge when it comes to SEO. The key is to understand your own website intricately and devise plans depending upon what works best for you. Listed below are a few things that are commonly done wrong.

1. Finding the right theme

Ask yourself, how did you choose your WordPress theme while creating your website? Odds are you picked the most visually attractive theme that you thought would appeal to your customers.

Another common mistake people make is picking the most premium or commonly-used themes, as they think these are shortcuts to success. This is where you’re going wrong. Many complicated themes are filled with poor code that slows down your website. And loading time is a small but significant factor that affects your SEO rankings.

So pick a theme that works best for the nature of your website. Minimalist themes can be just as effective as complicated themes. And remember to check how often these themes are updated; you do not want an outdated theme dragging your site down.

2. The plugin game

WordPress plugins can truly be a boon for website SEO. But people tend to overdo it by adding too many of them and as a result, the website becomes heavier and slower to load. In order to improve user experience and your website ranking, it is imperative to pick and install only the right plugins for your website.

Multiple plugins also tend to occupy excessive server resources. Therefore, many managed WordPress hosts do not allow websites that consume too many resources.

3. The sitemap issue

As a basic WordPress website doesn’t give you too many features and controls, you’re bound to install SEO plugins, most of which have the option of sitemaps. You can even create multiple sitemaps by getting additional plugins to allow you further control over your site.

But here’s the problem. Many people forget to submit their sitemaps to Google Search Console. Once you fail to do that, search engines stop recognizing your sitemaps and needless to say, you won’t show up anywhere despite all your customized plugins.

4. Link stuffing gone wrong

Adding links to your site is one of the most important SEO tactics, and can do wonders for your website ranking. Many themes come with pre-set links to help you out. But there are two ways this can go wrong:

  • Over stuffing – Nothing overdone is attractive, and adding links is no exception. Adding too many links can distract your user and also turn them off your site. A good rule of thumb to go by is using up to 20 links. This way you’re well within your bounds.
  • Stuffing nonsense – The relevance of the content you feed to your customers is more important than you think. Offer original and relevant content that is useful to your customers so that they spend more time on your site, thus improving your rankings.

5. Schema gone wrong

Schema markup is the primary code that allows Google (and other search engines) to understand what your website is about. You showcase your Name, Address and Phone Number (NAP) so that Google can run it through its algorithms and display your site if it has local relevance. So this is the single most important thing that helps Google understand who you are and what kind of services you provide.

This obviously improves your rankings and visibility. But if you get this wrong, it could work against you, as it confuses Google.

The best way out of this challenge is to gain a deep understanding of how Schema works. Various online resources can help you learn that. For starters, you can check-out the ‘Organization of Schema‚ page to look for the list of most common types of schema markup and the ‘Full Hierarchy‚ page for the schema types that you will need.

6. Underestimating alt text for images

People often focus all their attention on optimizing text content and miss out visual content, i.e. images. It’s a big blunder. Without fail, make the time to give your images proper names and descriptions. This will go a long way in improving your site’s functionality, accessibility and ranking.

So if you’ve overlooked this, rename all your images now and add proper descriptions. Another shortcut to do this is using the SEO Friendly Images WordPress Plugin.

7. Wrongly done permalinks

Despite the huge amount of information available on permalinks over the internet, it is one of the most difficult things to get right. And your website takes a really big hit by doing this wrong.

So here’s an over-simplified tip for you. The ideal permalink will allow you to include two very basic yet important things: post name and category. It should look something like this: “/%category%/%postname%/“.

What this does is allows search engines as well as your site visitors to clearly understand what your website is about.

8. Ignoring H1 tags

As your webpage grows, you might end up having a lot more duplicate content than is advisable. Even if this doesn’t affect you initially, it will in the long run.

With growing popularity and content, you might feel you have no option but to use the same H1 tags for multiple pages. But this makes search engines alert and eventually averse to your site. So as far as possible, get precise and innovative and provide only unique content for your site.

And don’t even think of employing the age-old technique of overusing keywords in your meta tags. This might have worked in the past, but Google is very smart and now identifies it.

9. The sin of using duplicate content

It’s not an exaggeration when I say it’s a sin to use duplicate content. The problem is that you might be doing this without even knowing that you are.

The most common mistake in this department is over-categorizing and over-tagging: Google identifies content with multiple common tags and flags them as duplicate content. As a rule, a post should typically be in no more than one or two categories, and tagging should be limited only to the most relevant topics covered in the post.

Furthermore, if you find no obvious way in which you can tag a specific post, don’t tag it. Not every post needs tagging.

However, it is easy to tackle this. WordPress offers plugins like All-In-One-SEO or SEO Plugin Yoast to avoid this error. These plugins add ‘No Follow‘ tags to pages that help search engines categorize pages appropriately.

10. Forgetting internal links and related posts

Linking one article to other relevant content across your site increases the average time spent by a user on your website, and also acts as a search engine ranking signal. However, adding unrelated links or poor-quality content will do the opposite and put them off.

If you do not wish to use too many internal links, another smart way to go about it is by adding related posts. Get a plugin to pick the right kind of posts to display as related posts to keep your relevance and integrity intact. The best way to do this is getting the right balance between internal links and related posts.

So read this article through again and thoroughly examine your SEO practices to identify how many of these aforementioned things are you getting wrong, and how many you are doing right.

Another factor that significantly affects your user experience is your host. A slow host will increase your loading time and therefore affect users. Keep this in mind while picking your web hosting company.

Your goal should always be to give your visitors rich quality and relevant content, delivered in the right manner and at the right speed. That is the only true way to keep your customers happy and run a thriving website.

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

Final Boarding Call for Content Marketing World: Don’t Miss these 10 Presentations

Does anyone look forward to getting on an airplane anymore? Sure, you may be excited about where you’re going or what you plan to do when you get there. But anyone happily anticipating the screening, boarding, and flying part—well, I’ll have whatever vitamin supplement they’re on.

If you’re headed to Content Marketing World, odds are there’s a flight in your immediate future. Fortunately, this trip is definitely worth the hassle. Just keep in mind how much you’re about to learn, how many amazing marketers you’re about to meet, and you can smile your way through the unpleasantness.

To help you get the most out of your trip—enough to sustain you through a legroom-free flight home—make sure you attend the following ten sessions. These first-class (get it?) marketers have all logged hours of flight time sharing their knowledge all over the world. Each one is uniquely qualified to be your marketing coach (get it?). They’re in a business class (GET IT?) all their own.

So put your tray table up, stow your carry-on, and add these sessions to your schedule. And in the case of a water landing, this post can be used as a flotation device.

Ten Can’t Miss Sessions at Content Marketing World 2017

#1: Linda Boff

Linda is the CMO of GE, with over 15 years of experience in their marketing department. Under her leadership, GE has been absolutely dominating the content game, with an energy and creativity that’s rare in B2B. Their Instagram has over 300,000 followers. They did a hit science fiction podcast, The Message. They held a robot rock concert to showcase their electricity infrastructure solutions. In short, Linda is helping make B2B content cool, and I’m excited to hear what she has to say.

The Session: Imagination at Work: Lessons in Storytelling from GE

Linda’s session is a keynote, so you don’t have to pre-register for it. Just set your alarm early and plan to get to the main hall by 8 a.m. on Wednesday the 6th.

#2: Andrew Davis

Andrew is the best-selling author of Town Inc., a sought-after keynote speaker, and a brilliant marketer with a history of fantastic content, from documentaries to blog posts. He’s also the only presenter at Content Marketing World who has worked with the Muppets. If you’ve never seen Andrew speak before, you’re in for a treat: He’s a dynamic presenter who will drop knowledge while keeping the energy level high.

The Session: Show Me: How Inventive Video Marketers Spin Stories into Revenue

We all know that video content marketing is not even the next big thing – it’s the current big thing. But connecting the marketing to the ROI is still a challenge. Andrew’s session should help you find the gold in them thar videos.

#3: Amisha Gandhi

As the Global Head of Influencer Marketing at SAP, Amisha is helping to bring influencer marketing out of the “Wild West.” She’s helping develop the best practices that will help marketers reach a higher level of influencer marketing maturity and sophistication. Her insights are a crucial component of our eBook, Influence 2.0.

The Session: Implementing a Global Influencer Program at a Large B2B Enterprise

Amisha is uniquely qualified to lead this session, in that she is currently implementing a global influencer program at SAP. This nuts-and-bolts session is sure to be packed with practical knowledge you can use in your influencer marketing efforts.

#4: Ann Handley

A tireless crusader in the war against mediocre content, Ann Handley has helped thousands of marketers find their unique creative voice. She’s the best-selling author of Everybody Writes and co-author of Content Rules, and is the Chief Content Officer for MarketingProfs. She’s also a dynamic, engaging speaker, ever ready to cut through the nonsense to inform and inspire.

The Session: Writing Secrets from Prolific and Productive Writers (The Jerks!): How to Create Better Content When No One Has Enough Time

Ann’s sessions are always (justifiably) extremely popular, so you have two chances to catch her presentation this time around. Make sure to register early! Even if you’re not directly in a content role, Ann’s advice can help improve whatever writing you do.

#5: Heather Hurst

Heather is the Director of Corporate Marketing at Workfront, helping create content resources that match with the company’s vision of helping people be more efficient and effective at work. Under her leadership, the Talking Work blog has become a destination for smart content from her team and from experts worldwide.

The Session: Stop Killing Your Content Team: How to Scale Your Work with the Resources You Have

Producing quality content at scale has been a thorny problem for the industry, and Heather is just the person to address it. From prioritization to resource allocation to the power of repurposing, this session should help close the resource gap.

#6: Lee Odden

You know that old Wayne Gretzky quote about not going for where the puck is, but going for where the puck is going to be? Lee is the Wayne Gretzky of marketing. He was into SEO before it was cool, was a pioneer of influencer marketing, and is now leading the charge for integrated, holistic marketing. As CEO of TopRank Marketing, Lee has turned a boutique digital agency into a global powerhouse, equally at home working with Fortune 100 companies and local small businesses. He’s also a pretty great boss (we’re hiring). And, should you meet him at one of the networking events: It’s pronounced OH-den, like the Norse god, not ODD-en.

The Session: Big Brand Influencer Marketing – Trends and Best Practices and Creating an Influencer Marketing Strategy: A to Z.

TopRank Marketing’s philosophy of influencer marketing goes far deeper than one-off endorsement gigs. Lee’s strategy aims to create ongoing, mutually beneficial relationships with the people truly influential to your target audience.

#7: Robert Rose

Robert is the Founder of the Content Advisory and Chief Strategy Advisor at Content Marketing Institute. He’s one of the original masters of content marketing—together with Joe Pulizzi, he helped write the rules of effectively using content to drive business purposes. His latest book, Killing Marketing (co-authored with Joe), is all about achieving the holy grail of content marketing: making it a profit center rather than a budget item.

The Session: Becoming an Audience Company: Moving beyond Media in a Post-Digital World and Return on Audience: Rebooting Content Marketing and Building a Scalable, Measurable Strategy

Not only can Robert‘ sessions help you realize business benefits from your content marketing, he can show you how to make content itself a business. And he should know: Content Marketing Institute itself is a prime example of a business built content-first.

#8: Adam Singer

Data is what turns content into content marketing. Every content creator should have a handle on the analytics that tell us what our audience is interested in, how our content is resonating, and how our results translate into revenue. Adam is the Analytics Advocate at Google, and he’s tasked with helping marketers understand how to use Google’s tools to make their marketing work better.

The Session: Reporting, Google Data Studio and Data Visualization for Marketers

If you’re a content creator, this session is a great opportunity to round out your skillset. Learn how to dive into the data and generate insights you can use to fuel your next round of content. If you’re already a data nerd, this is your chance to get even deeper inside the Google-verse.

#9: Amanda Todorovich

The Content Marketing Institute named Amanda their Content Marketer of the Year last year, and she’s returning this year to share her secrets of creating award-winning content. With over 20 years of experience in the industry, Amanda has both practical knowledge and creative inspiration to spare. She’s currently the Director of Content Marketing at Cleveland Clinic, helping bring compelling content to the healthcare industry.

The Session: The Inside Story of How Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials Drives Consistent Web Traffic and Builds an Audience

Healthcare is a tough industry for marketers, with changing markets and regulations constantly putting pressure on content creators. That makes Amanda’s success story all the more compelling. She’s sure to have ideas you can put into action, regardless of your industry.

#10: Tim Washer

Tim has a unique pedigree as a marketer: He’s a stand-up comedian and a comedy writer for shows like Saturday Night Live, in addition to his pioneering work as the Creative Director of SP Marketing at Cisco. He clearly demonstrates how creativity and humor can spice up even the most “boring” B2B content. Simply put, this is a guy who can make hilarious videos about internet infrastructure solutions.

The Session: How to Use Improv Techniques to Improve Your B2B Storytelling

Improv workshops are all the rage in corporate America right now, and it’s not hard to see why: Improv requires quick thinking, teamwork, and extraordinary empathy for the audience to succeed. Tim’s session is guaranteed to crack you up and make your content livelier.

The Captain Has Turned on the Content Marketing Insights Sign

There are hundreds of sessions to choose from at Content Marketing World this year, all of them presented by some of the brightest minds in marketing. The TopRank Marketing team will be there in force, and we’ll be seeing as many of them as we possibly can. Keep an eye on the blog for takeaways, liveblogs, and extra content all next week. And make sure to reserve time in your schedule for these ten sessions.

If you’re attending the conference, keep an eye out for me, Ashley Zeckman, Caitlin Burgess, Tiffani Allen, and Knute Sands. We look forward to meeting all of you!


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Final Boarding Call for Content Marketing World: Don’t Miss these 10 Presentations | http://www.toprankblog.com

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