Archiv für den Monat: März 2018

Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters

Google AdWords Releases New Keyword Planner Tool
An updated and more feature-rich Google AdWords Keyword Planner tool has been released, including a newly-designed forecasts area showing a unified overview and the ability to add multiple keywords in bulk, all now available to anyone with access to the latest iteration of the AdWords experience. Search Engine Journal

Forecast: Digital Advertising Pulling Away From TV on Global Basis
New research from Zenith forecasts big gains for global digital ad revenue, increasing a lead built last year and pointing towards a 44.6 percent share of total ad revenue by 2020. With the U.S. and China leading the 2017 through 2020 adspend growth forecast, mobile will be the biggest contributing medium. Marketing Land

Users Worry About Facebook Data: Plan To Use Less, Stop Altogether
Facebook users have said they’ll cut their time on the site or, in some cases, leave entirely, according to new survey data from Raymond James. 44 percent of respondents were “very concerned” about Facebook’s use of their data, while 40 percent said that they were “somewhat concerned,” with 8 percent planning to stop signing in completely. MediaPost

EU Antitrust Chief Keeps Open Threat to Break Up Google: Report
As it drafts transparency regulations for technology firms, the European Union hasn’t ruled out splitting Google into smaller companies, and holds “grave suspicions” about the firm’s dominance. Reuters

Google Starts Rolling Out Mobile-First Search Index
Google’s long-anticipated migration to mobile-first indexing has begun, with the Internet giant on Monday announcing a roll-out in notifications to an increasing number of websites. MediaPost

LinkedIn Just Launched Some Snapchat-Like Features for Video Creators
New text styles, video filters, and other Snapchat-like options have recently debuted on LinkedIn, which said that video is being shared at rates 20 times that of other content types. AdWeek

Facebook Will No Longer Show Audience Reach Wstimates for Custom Audiences After Vulnerability Detected
Marketers using Facebook’s custom audience targeting will no longer see campaign reach estimates, after researchers discovered a possible privacy exploit and the social media firm suspended the popular metric. Marketing Land

Instagram Now Lets You Link to Hashtags and Other Profiles in Your Bio
Linkable biography hashtags and the ability to link to other profiles are two features that have recently been added to Instagram, as the company moves towards a more interactive online bio. The Next Web

Snapchat Bulks Up Location-Based Ad Targeting & Launches In-Store Analytics Tool
New location-based ad targeting features have been rolled out to marketers by Snapchat, including three tools aimed at pinpointing geographic points. Marketing Land

B2B Marketers Need to Get Ready for GDPR
With the EU’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) May 25 compliance deadline looming, as few as 15 percent of B2B marketers may be fully in-step with the upcoming requirements. Chief Marketer

Google News Initiative Kicks Off With Subscribe With Google, Other Efforts
Details about a new “Subscribe With Google” framework for publishers were announced by Google in New York City Tuesday, along with a Google Analytics-based publisher dashboard. Marketing Land

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

Marketoonist Personal Data Comic

Take a humorous look at personal data and terms of service – Marketoonist

BREAKING: Aging Punk Marks Himself Safe on Facebook Following 7 Second Break Up – The Hard Times

Mark Zuckerberg Prepares For Congressional Testimony By Poring Over Lawmakers‘ Personal Data – The Onion

The Glory That Was Yahoo – Fast Company

You Are What You ‘Like‘ – Psychology Today

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • TopRank Marketing Blog – Top 75 Content Marketing Blogs & Websites For Content Marketers — FeedSpot
  • Lee Odden – 20 Inspiring Digital Marketing Experts That You Need to Know — Digital Doughnut

Be sure to check in next week, when we’ll be sharing all new marketing news stories, or you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.


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TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2018. |
Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Source:: toprankblog.com

Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters

Google AdWords Releases New Keyword Planner Tool
An updated and more feature-rich Google AdWords Keyword Planner tool has been released, including a newly-designed forecasts area showing a unified overview and the ability to add multiple keywords in bulk, all now available to anyone with access to the latest iteration of the AdWords experience. Search Engine Journal

Forecast: Digital Advertising Pulling Away From TV on Global Basis
New research from Zenith forecasts big gains for global digital ad revenue, increasing a lead built last year and pointing towards a 44.6 percent share of total ad revenue by 2020. With the U.S. and China leading the 2017 through 2020 adspend growth forecast, mobile will be the biggest contributing medium. Marketing Land

Users Worry About Facebook Data: Plan To Use Less, Stop Altogether
Facebook users have said they’ll cut their time on the site or, in some cases, leave entirely, according to new survey data from Raymond James. 44 percent of respondents were “very concerned” about Facebook’s use of their data, while 40 percent said that they were “somewhat concerned,” with 8 percent planning to stop signing in completely. MediaPost

EU Antitrust Chief Keeps Open Threat to Break Up Google: Report
As it drafts transparency regulations for technology firms, the European Union hasn’t ruled out splitting Google into smaller companies, and holds “grave suspicions” about the firm’s dominance. Reuters

Google Starts Rolling Out Mobile-First Search Index
Google’s long-anticipated migration to mobile-first indexing has begun, with the Internet giant on Monday announcing a roll-out in notifications to an increasing number of websites. MediaPost

LinkedIn Just Launched Some Snapchat-Like Features for Video Creators
New text styles, video filters, and other Snapchat-like options have recently debuted on LinkedIn, which said that video is being shared at rates 20 times that of other content types. AdWeek

Facebook Will No Longer Show Audience Reach Wstimates for Custom Audiences After Vulnerability Detected
Marketers using Facebook’s custom audience targeting will no longer see campaign reach estimates, after researchers discovered a possible privacy exploit and the social media firm suspended the popular metric. Marketing Land

Instagram Now Lets You Link to Hashtags and Other Profiles in Your Bio
Linkable biography hashtags and the ability to link to other profiles are two features that have recently been added to Instagram, as the company moves towards a more interactive online bio. The Next Web

Snapchat Bulks Up Location-Based Ad Targeting & Launches In-Store Analytics Tool
New location-based ad targeting features have been rolled out to marketers by Snapchat, including three tools aimed at pinpointing geographic points. Marketing Land

B2B Marketers Need to Get Ready for GDPR
With the EU’s General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) May 25 compliance deadline looming, as few as 15 percent of B2B marketers may be fully in-step with the upcoming requirements. Chief Marketer

Google News Initiative Kicks Off With Subscribe With Google, Other Efforts
Details about a new “Subscribe With Google” framework for publishers were announced by Google in New York City Tuesday, along with a Google Analytics-based publisher dashboard. Marketing Land

ON THE LIGHTER SIDE:

Marketoonist Personal Data Comic

Take a humorous look at personal data and terms of service – Marketoonist

BREAKING: Aging Punk Marks Himself Safe on Facebook Following 7 Second Break Up – The Hard Times

Mark Zuckerberg Prepares For Congressional Testimony By Poring Over Lawmakers‘ Personal Data – The Onion

The Glory That Was Yahoo – Fast Company

You Are What You ‘Like‘ – Psychology Today

TOPRANK MARKETING & CLIENTS IN THE NEWS:

  • TopRank Marketing Blog – Top 75 Content Marketing Blogs & Websites For Content Marketers — FeedSpot
  • Lee Odden – 20 Inspiring Digital Marketing Experts That You Need to Know — Digital Doughnut

Be sure to check in next week, when we’ll be sharing all new marketing news stories, or you can follow us at @toprank on Twitter for even more timely daily news. Also, don’t miss the full video summary on our TopRank Marketing TV YouTube Channel.


Email Newsletter
Gain a competitive advantage by subscribing to the
TopRank® Online Marketing Newsletter.

© Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®, 2018. |
Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters | http://www.toprankblog.com

The post Digital Marketing News: New AdWords Tool, Global Digital Adspend Up, LinkedIn Video Filters appeared first on Online Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Source:: toprankblog.com

How to migrate your WordPress website domain name

Are you looking for a guide to migrate your WordPress website domain name? If the answer is “yes”, then you’ve come to the right place.

Migrating a WordPress domain name is not an overly common occurrence. However, there are many instances where a website might be required to change its domain name.

For example, your website might be penalized heavily by Google, and you want a new domain, or you might want to rebrand your business to a new name. Everything is fine until you have a proper reason to do so.

In this article, we will focus on the tools and techniques that will allow you to migrate WordPress website domain name. Before we start, however, let’s try to understand the impact of migrating your website domain on your SEO.

What is the impact of changing domain name on SEO?

One of the most common questions that a website owner has is: what will be the impact of moving the domain name on SEO?

As you might expect, Google will not respond quickly to the change in domain, and initially your search engine traffic will be impacted. With time and effort, however, your traffic will get back to normal after the switch.

To ensure that you get your traffic back, you need to follow a few simple steps. Don’t worry – we will go through them in this article. In short, you need to not only to buy a new domain, but also carry out proper 301 redirects to ensure that your SEO doesn’t get impacted any more than you can help.

Things to do before you start

Before we start, you need to do some pre-steps. These pre-steps will ensure that you don’t lose any of your work, and will also prepare the website for migration.

For the sake of an example, we will name the old site as “www.example.com” and the new site as the “www.newexample.com.” We will use these throughout the article for reference purposes.

How to migrate your WordPress website domain name

1. Creating a full backup

The first step is to always create a backup of your website, including files and database. As you are using WordPress, you will find a lot of backup plugins to do the task. We recommend using BackupBuddy, VaultPress, BackWPup or Duplicator. You can also use other backup plugins or services of your choice.

Last but not least, you can also back up your website using the Cpanel or use phpMyAdmin. Only try out these manual methods if you are sure what you are doing. For the most part, it’s a good idea to stick with backup plugins unless you’re 100% confident.

Once the backup is created, you can download it to your computer, or simply store it in the cloud.

2. Setting up the new site

To simplify things, we’ll use Duplicator as the example plugin for walking you through these steps.

To get started, you need to install the Duplicator plugin on your old site, www.example.com. Once done, you need to navigate to the plugin page from the WordPress side menu.

After you open the plugin, all you need to do is click on the “create” button to start the process of duplicating your website. After you provide the name of the package, it shouldn’t take more than 2-3 minutes for the backup to be complete.

Once done, you can download the package and secure it for the next step. For the sake of the tutorial, we will name the package “thekey.php”.

3. Connecting through FTP

The next step is to connect to your new site (www.newexample.com). You can use FileZilla to connect. After connection, just copy the the backup file, “thekey.php” into the root directory of the new website. You should be able to now access the website by typing the URL in your browser.

http://www.newexample.com/thekey.php

You need to change the URL and the file name accordingly for the above URL to work. Once done, you will now see a Duplicator Installer screen where it will ask for basic information such as the database.

Ensure that you check the “Table Removal” option and also ensure that the database on the new website is empty.

Next, you need to click on the “I have read all the warning and notices.” By clicking the “Run Deployment” option, the deployment process will now start.

After the initial installation process is completed, you will see another screen which is the “Update” screen. In this screen, you need to enter the old domain name and the new domain name. The plugin will try to guess the old and new URLs, but you should double-check to ensure that both values are correct.

The final step is to wait for the process to complete. After the completion, you can now log in to the WordPress admin panel using the old credentials and check if everything is working fine. The plugin also tries to prompt you to create a new backup which you should consider that you can always revert to the first instance if something goes wrong from here onwards.

You can also delete the installer file and clear your directory for any unnecessary files. You also need to re-initiate the permalinks by going to “Settings” -> “Permalinks.”

4. Final step: Implementing 301 redirects and notifying Google

With all the backups loaded into the new website, it is now time to tell Google that your new site is ready. To do so, you need to set up permanent 301 redirects using a simple .htaccess file hack. This hack is also used when switching a website from HTTP to HTTPS in WordPress.

You can find the .htaccess file in your wp-admin or wp-includes folder. It is a hidden file, and you might to search for hidden files if you are not able to locate it. After you locate the file, copy and paste the below code to make the magic happen.

#Options +FollowSymLinks
RewriteEngine on
RewriteRule ^(.*)$ http://www.newexample.COM/$1 [R=301,L]

Don’t forget to replace newexample with your new domain name.

With redirection complete, it is now time to tell Google about your new domain.

You need to use Google Search Console to let Google know about the change. Go to the left-hand menu and click on “Change of Address.” You can follow this simple guide by Google for step-by-step instructions.

Conclusion

Migration a website domain name is not a simple task. You need to carry out the steps with caution and concentration.

We hope you found this guide useful. If you are not sure how to proceed with the whole process, it is always advisable to hire a professional to do it for you. Also, don’t forget to share your opinions in the comments section below.

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

A guide to the standard reports in Google Analytics: Audience reports

Google Analytics is a tool that can provide invaluable insights into what’s happening on your website, your levels of traffic and engagement, and the success of your campaigns.

If you’re a newcomer to Google Analytics, however, the array of different reports available to you can be a little overwhelming. Where should you begin? Where can you find the most useful data about your website?

Google Analytics standard reports are the preset reports listed down the left-hand side of your dashboard, divided into the segments Real-Time, Audience, Acquisition, Behavior and Conversions.

The information that appears in these is preset by Google Analytics, and gives an insight into the data on every part of your site, from your audience demographics to the channels through which they find your website.

In this series, we’ve set out to tackle the ambitious task of explaining each segment of Google Analytics and the standard reports they contain. Last time, we looked at Real-Time Reports and how they can be used in your marketing and SEO campaigns.

In this instalment, we’re going to look at Audience Reports: what you can learn from them, and how you can get the most out of the data that they offer.

What are Audience Reports?

As with Real-Time Reports, the secret to what these reports do is in the name: they tell you more about your audience, the people who are coming to your site.

The Audience section of Google Analytics is an extensive one, with no fewer than fifteen sub-sections sitting within it, most of those with several different reports.

We won’t cover each one in exhaustive detail in this guide, but will give a quick whistle-stop tour of the main sections and look at some ways that you can use these reports to maximum effect in your marketing campaigns.

Overview

The Overview section shows you your website’s current audience at a glance. It’s not in real-time – you need Real-Time Reports for that – but nevertheless presents a useful snapshot of the current audience metrics on your site, with information on users, unique users, sessions, page views, bounce rate and more.

The default time period is set to a week, but you can use the calendar drop-down in the top right corner to adjust it and view metrics over a longer or shorter period. You can also use the buttons just below that to view hour-by-hour, day-by-day, week-by-week or month-by-month stats (note that the last two of these will only work if the time span you’ve selected is more than a week/month).

Active Users

This report gives you an insight into the number of unique users who have visited your site over various time periods – 1 day, 7 days, 14 days and 28 days.

This report is most useful for understanding the success of a promotional campaign while it’s running. As Google’s Analytics Help text for the Active Users report advises:

“If the numbers are consistently in line with your expectations, you’ve found your sweet spot.

“If the numbers are below expectations, reevaluate your marketing efforts to see whether you’re targeting the appropriate audiences, and whether your ads are winning auctions.

“In cases where you have a lot of 1-Day Active Users but the numbers drop off for longer term users, that can signal things like problems with a new release, or that initial enthusiasm isn’t translating into long-term engagement. For example, lots of users might be downloading an app but are finding that it doesn’t really meet a need they have or that it doesn’t capture their interest.”

Lifetime Value

The Lifetime Value report for Google Analytics was first tested in the first quarter of 2016 (as reported by Search Engine Roundtable at the time) and was rolled out fully in early 2017, although as I write this, the report is still in beta.

The report is geared towards Google Analytics users who have an ecommerce website, and is only available if you have activated ecommerce tracking on Google Analytics.

The Lifetime Value report allows you to filter by the date on which a certain user was acquired, making it possible to analyze users acquired during the most recent day-long, week-long or month-long campaign. It also allows you to compare various different Lifetime Value (LTV) metrics, including:

  • Appviews per user (applies only to mobile app users)
  • Pageviews per user (applies only to website users)
  • Goal completions per user
  • Revenue per user
  • Session duration per user
  • Sessions per user
  • Transactions per user

For a more in-depth examination of how these metrics are calculated, have a read of Optimize Smart’s ‘Measuring customers‘ lifetime value in Google Analytics for mobile app and website users‘.

Cohort Analysis

A cohort of users is any group of users that is segmented based on a date. For example, a cohort could be a group of users with the same acquisition date (technically in GA this would be the Date of First Session), or a group of users who completed their first transaction during a specific time period.

To configure a cohort report, there are four main selections you need to make:

Cohort type: This is the date that you want to base your cohort on. A little frustratingly, GA currently only gives one option for this section – Acquisition Date. However, it is possible to use report segmentation to get some additional insights, such as segmenting by traffic source or campaign.

Cohort size: This is the time window that you want to use for your cohort type: e.g. by day, by week, by month.

Metric: This is the actual data you will see presented in the report. You can choose from aggregated metrics such as pageviews or revenue, or per-user metrics such as sessions per user or transactions per user.

Date range: This is the date range used to construct the cohort; you can choose from the last 7 days, last 14 days, last 21 days or last 30 days.

For a much more detailed guide to using cohorts in Google Analytics, check out ‘Understanding the Google Analytics cohort report‘ by Analytics Talk.

Audiences

To populate this report with data, you first need to define an audience within Analytics. To do that, you should enable Demographics and Interests reports, then create an audience.

You can use one of the preconfigured audiences available within Analytics, or create one from scratch. An audience might be as general as “current shoppers” (including users who have >0 product views, and excluding those who have >0 purchases) or as specific as users who have viewed the detailed page for [Product x], and then returned within 7 days to purchase.

Finally, publish your audience to Analytics by adding Analytics as a destination for that audience. The Audiences report will display data for your audience(s) from the point at which you create the report onwards – it isn’t available retroactively.

Once this is all set up, you can view Acquisition, Behavior and Conversions metrics for the audiences you have defined, and respond to their performance with actions like:

  • Devoting more of your marketing budget to bidding on ads for those users
  • Expanding on the hours during which you bid on ads shown to those users
  • Expanding the number of sites on which you bid for ads shown to those users.

User Explorer

To populate this report with data, you need to first enable the User-ID feature in your property settings. Once set up, this report allows you to isolate and examine individual, rather than aggregate, user behavior.

For each client or user ID, you can view the following initial data:

  • Sessions
  • Avg. Session Duration
  • Bounce Rate
  • Revenue
  • Transactions
  • Goal Conversion Rate

Then after drilling into the ID, you can see the acquisition date and channel for that user, along with an activity log detailing which actions that user took on your site during each session. You can use the Filter by menu to add and remove data types, and expand and collapse individual sessions as necessary.

You can use the User Explorer report to more closely examine any noteworthy behavior that you spot within a particular segment, to get a more detailed understanding of what might be going on.

By examining individual session behavior, you can also see when your users fall short of completing certain goals, and remarket to those users with specific information related to their experiences. Additionally, you can personalize your customer service and offer informed guidance based on the context provided by the User Explore report. Just remember to tread the line between “helpful” and “creepy”!

Demographics

The Demographics section in Google Analytics gives an insight into the age and gender of your website audience, and how different age and gender groups behave differently on your site.

Google cautions that, “Demographics and interests data may only be available for a subset of your users, and may not represent the overall composition of your traffic” – so bear in mind that this data may not be present for the whole of your audience, depending on whether or not it can track them via a DoubleClick cookie or Device Advertising ID.

The Overview report shows you the age and gender breakdown of your audience at a glance, with age divided into 18-24, 25-34, 35-44, 45-54, 55-64 and 65+ bands. In the top right corner of each graph, you can see which percentage of users on the site this data represents.

The Age report gives a breakdown of how those different groups interact with your website – their average bounce rate, pages per session, session duration, and completion rate of any goals and conversions you’ve set – and the Gender report does the same for gender.

The graph at the top of the report allows you to view how many of each type of user accessed your site on any given day – so if you’ve been executing campaigns to drive a specific demographic (e.g. women aged 18-24) to your website, you can assess how successful that has been over time.

Interests

They say psychographic data, rather than demographic data, is where it’s at these days. If so, the Interests section of GA Audience Reports is where you’ll find your most valuable information. Google uses a variety of data points taken from places like Gmail, app messages, internet browsing habits and YouTube history to make a guess at each user’s personal interests.

GA splits up interest data into three categories, each with its own report: Affinity, In-Market and Other.

Affinity Categories: Users who have a general interest in the topic in question – Google describes the interest level of these users as “Lifestyles similar to TV audiences, for example: Technophiles, Sports Fans, and Cooking Enthusiasts”.

In-Market Segments: Users who have “product-purchase interests” in the topic in question, akin to a buyer who is at the bottom of a purchase funnel and ready to convert.

Other Categories: This category provides the most granular view of your users‘ interests. For example, says Google, “Affinity Categories includes Foodies, while Other Categories includes Recipes/Cuisines/East Asian”.

These reports display similar data to the Demographics reports, with users segmented by interest area instead of by age group or gender.

So what is interest data good for? If you’re an advertiser, you can use it to more effectively target ads based on specific interests. If you’re a publisher or otherwise publish content marketing to your site, you can get ideas for content topics based on what your users are most interested in.

You can also segment your report to get an insight into how these interest categories align with other demographics or behaviors. For example, below I’ve segmented the Other report by the 18-24 age group, revealing which interests are most prevalent among the youngest age group on Search Engine Watch.

Apparently SEW’s younger readers are more into Bollywood than SEO…

Geo

The Geo section contains reports on the language and location of your website visitors.

In the Language report, you can view Acquisition, Behavior and Conversions for site users who speak different languages – particularly useful if you run an international business, or have been thinking about diversifying into international markets, as you can get an idea of which language markets it would be most worthwhile expanding into.

The Location report features a virtual map of your users‘ locations, which is useful for targeting search and social ads. You can zoom in on data at the city level, which allows local businesses to know if their marketing efforts are driving traffic and conversions from the right regions, and is also useful for publishers who want to create locally-focused content.

Behavior

The Behavior section allows you to break down your audience by how often they visit your site, and the duration of that visit. You can learn how many times on average a visitor comes to your website, how many days tend to elapse between sessions for repeat visitors, how long visitors remain on your site and how many pages they visit whilst there.

If you’re a publisher, this is valuable data on how ‘sticky‘ your website is and how successfully you’re managing to retain visitors. If you’re aiming to create more engaging content, you can track these metrics to gauge the success of your efforts, keeping an eye out for an increase in returning visitors or the duration of an average visit.

If you’re in ecommerce or sales, you can use this data in conjunction with Goals in order to learn what visitor behavior typically leads to a conversion.

Do you score the most conversions on the user’s first visit, or on subsequent visits? If the latter, what can you do to make your visitors more likely to return and convert?

Technology

The Technology section of GA Audience reports reveals which browsers, operating systems and even network providers your audience is using to access your site.

This information can be useful if your business creates online extensions, software or applications, and you want to know which browsers and operating systems to make them compatible with.

You can also use it to work out where you should be allocating your technical resources – if only a small fraction of your audience uses Opera, for example, it’s probably not worth putting a lot of time and effort into making sure that your website is optimized for that browser.

Mobile

If you’ve been in two minds about whether to optimize for mobile (though by now we hope we’ve persuaded you that it is worthwhile!) or want the data to back up an argument for a mobile site/app, head to Google Analytics‘ Audience => Mobile section.

In the Overview report you can see Acquisition, Behavior and Conversions data for desktop, mobile and tablet users – which can also allow you to learn, for example, if your bounce rate is significantly higher on mobile (which might indicate a poor mobile experience) or whether more users are completing purchases on a desktop device.

The Devices report then provides you with incredibly specific insights into the devices your audience is using to access your website, down to the make and model of the device.

If you’re developing a mobile app and are unsure about whether to produce it for Apple or Android, or want to test your mobile site using the most common devices wielded by your users, this is the report to look at.

Custom

In this section, you can create a custom Audience report using your own chosen variables, metrics and dimensions.

As the scope of this series is standard Google Analytics reports (not custom), I won’t go into detail here about how to get the most out of this report, but Econsultancy has a solid beginner’s guide to creating a custom report in Google Analytics if you want to get to grips with the basics.

Benchmarking

Benchmarking reports are only available if you have benchmarking enabled on Google Analytics, but once you do, it gives an extremely useful insight into how your website audience and performance compare with other companies in your industry.

Google allows you to get extremely granular with the industry categories, providing a list of more than 1,600 to choose from. You can further refine the data by geographic location and traffic volume, allowing you to compare like for like with other websites of the same size and location.

Users Flow

The Users Flow report is a fairly unique-looking report that doesn’t immediately resemble any of the other standard reports in Google Analytics.

As the name implies, it is useful for studying and trying to understand the “flow” of users through your website – the path that they typically take from page to page. It also highlights where users drop off – so you can isolate where exactly users might be getting stuck or losing interest, and take steps to remedy it.

A drop-down menu in the top left allows you to view user flow by location, language, browser, mobile device, and other custom data dimensions.

This view can be particularly useful for ecommerce marketers to understand the path that users typically take to conversion, as well as for publishers seeking to understand which articles bring the most users to the site, and where users typically navigate after reading them.

How do you make use of Google Analytics‘ many different Audience Reports? Do you have any novel applications to share? Leave a comment, and stay tuned for our next instalment on Acquisition Reports!

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

12 tips to improve your reputation strategy

To grow and stay ahead of your competitors, you need to take a hard look at your reputation strategy.

The online reputation of your business hinges on a variety of elements. It’s an ever-evolving digital mix-up of comments, reviews, blogs, and more.

It’s time to take a proactive approach to improve your online reputation. Not sure where to start? Here are 12 tips to make your business shine under any consumer microscope.

1. Upgrade your Trustpilot account

Trustpilot continues to sway consumers, and you probably have built up a few Trustpilot reviews for your business. But are you making the most of your Trustpilot account?

By upgrading your Trustpilot account from free to paid, you get more personalized features to net more ratings and reviews.

Paid Trustpilot features include:

  • Personalized email address from sender
  • Customizable review invitations to your customers
  • Rich snippet star rating in TrustBox
  • TrustBox optimization
  • Imported product reviews

Trustpilot paid features can make a big impact on your brand reputation. After all, reviews and ratings play a big role in consumer confidence to buy.

2. Get backlinks from high authority sites

A backlink from a high authority publication is a recommendation signal to consumers.

For example, people reading a Forbes article on “Best Health Apps” will assume that the Forbes journalist did his or her due diligence in finding the very best apps. This is a trust signal for consumers.

To get those high authority backlinks you can implement a link building strategy that allows you to be top of mind for journalists. Creating very shareable content on your blog or site is also a powerful way to earn those reputation building backlinks as well.

3. Have a “featured in” logo section

To amplify confidence to buy and boost your brand reputation, you can showcase the high authority publications your products or services have been featured in. This makes a Featured In section on your home page valuable, like this one from Your Doctors Online.

This reputation strategy tip is also a very easy one to implement once you have three or more high authority publications to list.

You can also use the press release strategy to develop a few high authority “Featured In” publications. Using PRNewswire iReach WebReach, you can launch a press release about your brand.

The press release will get picked up by a number of high authority publications, like Yahoo Finance. You can create a press release about a new product or service, new employee position, charity work, and more.

4. Get quoted everywhere!

Having a CEO, director, or manager quote in several publications can be another fantastic reputation strategy. This will compliment your link building strategy as well, since most quotes are accompanied by a link back to the experts business.

How do you get quoted everywhere? Well, it is actually easier than you may think. Using Help A Reporter Out (HARO) can accomplish this.

Simply sign up for a free account as a “Source,” fill in the information, and choose the industries you can add insights for.

This is a great way to boost your reputation as an authority in your industry. You will also get quality backlinks to your website, and use articles on social media to boost awareness and trust among your followers.

5. Facebook video ads

Video ads are trending in a big way for brands, and users want more videos than ever before. In fact, 90 percent of users said that videos are a big part of the decision process. Social media videos net 1,200 percent more shares than the average text social posts.

“It is indeed one of the best tactics to bring more exposure to your brand while helping you achieve your bottom-line,” Mike Templeman of Forbes explained.

Facebook video ads are among the best performers. Why video? Video is great for engagement and can also add that personal touch consumers want.

Like this video from Backlinko’s Facebook page with nearly 3,500 shares:

You can show your social audience that you are indeed real, knowledgeable, and highlight your brand’s value and benefits.

6. YouTube videos

Your social media videos will often come from YouTube, making this is another reputation strategy worth pursuing. YouTube is the second largest search engine in the world and you can highlight your authority and expertise via YouTube videos quite easily.

Going back to the previous Backlinko example, Brian Dean uses YouTube videos to showcase his expertise on digital marketing in an engaging and actionable way.

If you want to increase your reputation and become a thought leader in your industry, YouTube can be valuable. You can also build up a subscriber base to remarket to.

7. Collaborate with social media influencers

There is nothing like boosting your reputation through the recommendations of influencers your customers already trust. This makes social media influencers an important asset to add to your reputation strategy.

Did you know that 74 percent of people turn to social media for help with buying decisions? And 40 percent of people have made an online purchase after seeing an influencer use a product on social media.

Where can you find social media influencers to help improve your brand reputation? There are a few online platforms like FameBit, TapInfluence, and Traackr. FameBit is a free platform that allows you to connect with influencers in a variety of industries.

Since it is free, it’s a good way to test the social media influencer waters across social channels like YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

8. Get more blogger reviews

Social media is not the only place to utilize the power of influencers. If your brand sells products, getting more reviews from bloggers people follow and trust can boost your brand reputation.

To get your products reviewed by influential bloggers, you will need to send them a quick pitch. This can be via a social media message, or through their email or contact form from their website.

Here are a few pitch tips for outreach:

  • Keep your pitch short and sweet
  • Highlight your product’s benefits
  • Explain why the blogger’s audience will like your product
  • Let the blogger have your product for free
  • Let them know you have an influencer marketing budget

9. Start a podcast

Another great way to improve your reputation strategy is to start a podcast. Podcasts help showcase your knowledge and can cover a lot of trending topics your customers want information about.

“If you’re not already engaging your target market with podcasts, prepare to launch your first piece of audio content,” Tyler Basu explained in an Entrepreneur article.

Podcasts are a great way to feed information to your audience. They can easily listen to your podcast while driving, at the gym, on the bus or subway, and even at work.

Your audience doesn’t need to focus all their attention on written content. Creating a podcast is also easier than spending hours developing a blog post. A few podcast types include:

  • Interviews
  • Solo podcasts
  • Two or more hosts
  • Narrative podcasts
  • Or a combination of the above

You will also need a separate hosting platform for your podcasts. LibSyn and Blubrry are two hosting platforms that are affordable and easy to use.

10. List your product on Amazon

Getting your product listed on Amazon is an exceptional way to boost your online reputation. Did you know that 80 percent of Amazon users make an average of one purchase per month? Given that there are around 300 million Amazon users in total, that’s a lot of potential customers – and reviewers.

This makes Amazon a big trust builder for consumers and should be part of your reputation strategy. Amazon also has a product review and star rating. This can make a big impact on your brand’s reputation.

Amazon listing guidelines are actually not as difficult as you may think. You will need to follow the step-by-step process and you could have your product on Amazon within a few weeks.

11. Create Quality Content

One tried and true method for improving your reputation strategy is to create quality content. Those 300 word blog posts will simply not do anymore. You want your audience to be engaged and learn something from your articles.

Develop actionable blog posts that show step-by-step ways to solve issues consumers in your industry and niche may be experiencing.

For example, if you are catering content to small businesses, you can have a post about email marketing. In the post you can list the exact steps to set up an email marketing campaign and tips on how to make it successful.

This, of course, will be time-consuming. Your blog post may turn into a 2,000-word masterpiece. But long-form content is good!

Research has shown that 2,000+ word posts get more organic traffic:

Long form content also gets more social shares and linking domains:

This will increase brand reach and awareness, increase authority, and thus improve your reputation strategy.

12. Increase your Google ranking

Many consumers often begin looking for a product or service via Google search. Unfortunately, most searchers don’t go past page one of Google search results.

According to a Chitika report, only 4.8 percent of traffic will land on page two of search results.

Why? Well, one reason may be that Google is satisfying searcher intent better. But many consumers may not trust the content after Google page one. Are all page one listings reputable? Not at all, but the consumer may not know that.

A quick search for “running shoes” will return some questionable results:

Note that Nike and Reebok aren’t even in the above the fold content listed!

This makes getting the best Google rankings possible essential. Luckily, all the above reputation strategy tips will help you achieve better rankings. Page one Google ranking serves up a lot of benefits, including a powerful online reputation.

What’s your reputation strategy?

Your online reputation is essential to the growth and success of your brand. Without a reputable online presence, consumers will turn to your competitors.

The above 12 tips to improve your reputation strategy can make your brand shine when consumers start doing their due diligence before buying from you.

What is your reputation strategy?

Source:: searchenginewatch.com