Le Rosart

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Le Rosart ist ein Revival der von Jacques-François Rosart, im 18.Jahrhundert, geschnittenen Text- und Display-Schriften. Entwickelt wurde es von Lukas Schneider mit Unterstützung durch Ray O’Meara. Die zeitgenössische Interpretation ist durch umfangreiche Recherchen historischen Materials geprägt. Dazu gehörten neben der Sichtung und Analyse verschiedener Schriftmuster auch die Untersuchung von Rosarts Originalstempeln und -matrizen, die im Archiv des Museums Plantin-Moretus in Antwerpen aufbewahrt werden. Genau wie die Arbeit seines Rivalen Fleischmann weisen Rosarts Entwürfe eine vertikale Kontrastachse und tropfenförmige Abschlüsse auf. Die digitale Version übernimmt diese Merkmale zusammen mit barocken Merkmalen wie dem „g“ mit „Antenne“, dem eigenwilligen „G“ oder den ausgestellten Serifen beim „E“.

Die von der Revolver Type Foundry herausgegebene Le Rosart wurde konzipiert, um den heutigen typografischen und technischen Anforderungen gerecht zu werden. Die Schriften wurden in zwei optischen Größen gezeichnet. Die majestätischen Display-Stile werden dabei durch eine eher zurückhaltende Text-Variante ergänzt. Le Rosart Text ist für kleinere Größen optimiert und zeichnet sich durch kräftigere Haarlinien, robuste Serifen und eine großzügigere Laufweite aus. Die Text- und Display-Schnitte enthalten beide eine Reihe von Ligaturen, Wahlformen, verschiedene Ziffernsätze einschließlich Bruchziffern, Pfeile und anderen Symbole, sowie Elemente zum Erstellen von Akkoladen (geschweifte Klammern bzw. Trennlinien) für die Textgestaltung. Die Text- und Display-Varianten umfassen jeweils fünf Strichstärken mit aufrechten und kursiven Stilen und sind für die Desktop-, App-, E-Book- und Webnutzung verfügbar.

Designer
Lukas Schneider

Publisher
Revolver Type Foundry

Source:: designmadeingermany.de

The Future SEO: Boardroom edition

30-second summary:

  • SEO’s dynamic nature and Google’s mysterious algorithm specifics keep the industry on its toes
  • Is it possible to simply spot the inefficiencies of SEO in its infancy and foresee trends?
  • With over 20 years of leadership roles, SEO pioneer Kris Jones taps into his experience to help SEOs derive more strategic value

Pretty much anytime we speak about something’s future, we’re doing something called extrapolating. By definition, extrapolating involves extending existing data or trends to assume the same procedure will continue in the future. It’s a form of the scientific method that we probably use every day in our own lives, quite reasonably, too: the summers will be hot, the downtown traffic will be bad at 9 AM, and the sun will rise tomorrow morning.

But how can we look into the future of something as complex and ever-changing as SEO? As with all cases of hindsight, we are clear on how SEO began and how it has transformed over time.

We see the inefficiencies of SEO in its infancy and how advancing search engines have altered the playing field.

The catch is this: how can we surmise about the future of SEO without having access to all the mysterious algorithm specifics that Google itself holds?

The answer is simple: we have to extrapolate.

I’ve seen SEO from the boardroom perspective for more than 20 years. I’ve seen the old days of keyword stuffing to the semi-modernization of the late 2000s to the absolute beast that Google has become now, in the 2020s.

Given that, where do I think SEO is going in the not-too-distant future? Here are some thoughts on that.

User intent will remain crucial

One aspect of SEO that is essential right now and will become only more vital as time goes on is user intent in search queries.

It’s an antiquated view to think that Google still cares much about exact-match keywords. Maybe 15 to 20 years ago, getting keywords exactly right in your content was a huge deal. Google matched queries to corresponding word strings in content and then served the best of that content to a user.

Today, trying to optimize for exact-match keywords is a futile effort, as Google now understands the intent behind every query, and it’s only going to get better at it as time goes by.

If you recall Google’s BERT update from late 2019, you’ll remember that this was the change that allowed Google to comprehend the context of each search query, or the meaning behind the words themselves. And the latest Multitask Unified Model (MUM) update adds further depth and dimensions to understanding search intent.

No longer does Google look only at the words “family attractions.” It knows that that query references children’s activities, fun activities, and events that are generally lighthearted and innocent.

And all of that came from two words. How did Google do it? Its consistent algorithm updates have allowed it to think like a human.

All of this is to say that user intent has to be part of your keyword and content strategy going forward when you’re doing SEO.

Produce more evergreen content

Sometimes, over the years, I have heard people mention that devising an effective content marketing strategy is difficult because as soon as a topic’s period of relevance is over, that content will never rank again. Use your data to analyze content performance and strike the right balance between content and formats.

If you don’t know any more about this subject, you might be tempted to believe that. Maybe, at one time, you got a content piece entitled “Top Furniture Brands of 2019” to rank for the featured snippet. That makes sense. The post was probably a long listicle that described the best brands and linked out to the manufacturers‘ websites or retail stores that carried those brands.

But maybe, as spring of 2019 transitioned into fall and winter, that post fell way down the rankings and now can’t be found anywhere anymore.

The reason is obvious: you haven’t made the content evergreen. The best furniture brands of 2019 may not be the best brands of 2020 or 2021 or 2022. So, what do you do? You put the work in to make the blog post evergreen by updating it. Go through and change out the best brands, change the content, change the post’s title, and then republish the post.

You can also just plain focus on subjects that will almost never need any updating at all:

  • “Top 20 Christmas cookies to bake this year”
  • “How to train a dog”
  • “10 Steps for Hanging Heavy Objects on the Wall”

Whether it’s 2021 or 2050 or 2100, there are going to be people who have never hung a thing on a wall before and will need some help online.

Whatever your market niche is, do some topic research in Answer the Public, Semrush, or BuzzSumo to find relevant subjects for you. You can also mine the SERPs to see what kinds of content are ranking already for your desired topics. Just remember to mix in plenty of evergreen content with your more timely content posts. Google will reward you for it.

Mobile will remain first

This final point is about mobile-first indexing, but you likely already know about that. It’s certainly no secret that Google is going to rank your website’s mobile version when it crawls your pages. About 60 percent of all searches are now performed on mobile devices, and so Google now prioritizes a site’s mobile web pages over the desktop versions.

As I said, you knew all that.

What some people still may not know is that Google’s new Core Web Vitals should be a major part of your mobile page optimizations.

The Core Web Vitals are primarily a web-dev task. Overall, the three vitals work together to give users positive, seamless experiences when they access a web page.

The vitals are Cumulative Layout Shift (CLS), Largest Contentful Paint (LCP), and First Input Delay (FID).

CLS refers to the amount of moving around that a web page’s content does before it actually loads fully.

If you have a high CLS, that’s bad. It means some elements are appearing before the page loads all the way, which increases the chances of a user clicking on something that then moves elsewhere. That, in turn, means the user will probably click on something unintended.

LCP, meanwhile, is the time it takes for a page’s content to appear. It specifically refers to the amount of time between when you click on a URL and when the majority of that URL’s content appears for you to see.

Finally, FID measures how long it takes users to be able to interact with a web page in any way. These actions could be typing in a field or clicking menu items.

Even if you don’t work in web development, you can see how useful these three measures actually are. They all take user experience into account, which, coincidentally, is why they are part of Google’s larger 2021 Page Experience update.

The Core Web Vitals are essential in and of themselves, but I think my “boardroom” perspective on them is one we can all safely adopt: that they are just examples of more great things to come from Google.

The search engine giant is always thinking of new ways to make users have better, more helpful, and more positive experiences on its platform. As SEOs, we need to be ready to respond so we don’t get left in the dust.

To know the future, look to the past

We know that extrapolation can be taken only so far, but that’s why the past is so vital to understand. It can give us hints at what lies ahead.

What will Google think of next? It’s going to respond to whatever need is out there for improved online search experiences.

Think of 2020, when the pandemic was in its infancy. People needed information, and Google responded. Within months, you could tell whether restaurants were requiring masks indoors, how many virus cases were in your county, and where you could go for more information or help.

What, then, is the future of SEO? It’s going to be whatever the masses need it to become.

Kris Jones is the founder and former CEO of digital marketing and affiliate network Pepperjam, which he sold to eBay Enterprises in 2009. Most recently Kris founded SEO services and software company LSEO.com and has previously invested in numerous successful technology companies. Kris is an experienced public speaker and is the author of one of the best-selling SEO books of all time called, ‘Search-Engine Optimization – Your Visual Blueprint to Effective Internet Marketing‘, which has sold nearly 100,000 copies.

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The post The Future SEO: Boardroom edition appeared first on Search Engine Watch.

Source:: searchenginewatch.com

Unite with Might: 12 Top Ways Successful B2B Influencers Are Building Powerful Marketing Collaborations

Collaborating businesspeople silhouette image.

Collaborating businesspeople silhouette image.

How can B2B marketers build powerful and enduring collaborations using influencers?

There are more tactics available today than ever for influencer collaboration in the B2B space, but how can marketers find those that are actually achieving ongoing success?

We’ve been fortunate to feature top influencers from a number of industries in our third season of the Break Free B2B Marketing series of video interviews, and we wanted to share their top tactics for both being an influencer in the B2B space, and for improving collaboration.

Let’s dig in and learn how 12 subject matter experts are creating powerful collaborations between influencers and brands, with insightful tactics you can implement in your own marketing efforts as we head toward 2022.

Ramon Ray of Smart Hustle Media

@ramonray
Founder, Smart Hustle Media

Ramon Ray

[bctt tweet=““Always look for partnerships, at how you can work with others, and at how you can think bigger and more strategically.” — Ramon Ray @ramonray #BreakFreeB2B“ username=“toprank“]

„I think there are different ways that brands do different things. One thing talking to the brand at least, I think, and the influencers, is that — first, are you clear on what the goals are? Why do they want you? Is it reaching numbers? It could be. For me, it’s oftentimes that they want safety and security. We want someone who can consistently deliver and give us a good seminar, webinar, or host a product and be excited and draw the expertise out of our subject matter experts. So that’s one,“ Ramon noted.

„Second — are you living your brand, offline and online? Meaning can they trust that what you tweet — what you post on Instagram, is going to be something that’s going to make them proud. That’s okay for the brands you’re working with. So that’s two. And I think point three, I think the other thing to consider is, are you within the wheelhouse of what they want? If you’re an influencer for a headphone company, and you’re not all about music, you may not be a fit,“ Ramon added.

„I think those are a few things that I think about when we look at how we’re working with a brand, and how a brand may evaluate us — it’s safety, security, we try to do the right thing, and be good to work with. And I think that’s important,“ Ramon also shared.

Watch, listen to or read Ramon’s full interview by checking our the full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Ramon Ray of Smart Hustle Media on Small Business Success & Thinking Big.“

Minda Harts of The Memo

@MindaHarts
CEO and Founder, The Memo

Minda Harts

[bctt tweet=““Whether you have 300 followers or 300,000, it’s the way that you engage, and people have to trust you.” — Minda Harts @MindaHarts“ username=“toprank“]

What what does it take to be a thought leader, subject matter expert or an influencer?

“You know, I would say consistency. One of the things that I started before I had a best-selling book, or any of those things — I was consistent with the content that I put out there,“ Minda said.

„I picked one or two social media platforms, and I said, you know what, I’m going to give my all to these. My demographic is not on everything, right? So if I pick a couple, and I’m consistent, and every Monday I start with a newsletter, because you want to capture your fans or your potential clients. So I think that for me, it was being consistent,“ Minda added.

„Since 2015, every Monday I put out a newsletter. And then I repurpose that content on LinkedIn or Twitter — those are the most active platforms I’m on. I also try to be authentic to my voice, and talk about the things that I know my demographics are interested in. I bring my personal stories, and I asked them questions,“ Minda shared.

„Whether you have 300 followers or 300,000, it’s the way that you engage, and people have to trust you. Once you build that consistency and that trust, then all you need is those people who will constantly repurpose and retweet, and do some of those things. But it starts with that consistency. So make sure that you’re being true and authentic to the voice that you add to your community,“ Minda explained.

Check out Minda’s full interview and visit our full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Minda Harts of The Memo on Having Courageous Conversations.“

Keith Townsend of The CTO Advisor

@CTOAdvisor
Co-Founder, The CTO Advisory

Keith Townsend

[bctt tweet=““You have to put your thoughts out there. And sometimes putting your thoughts out there is the scariest part about becoming an influencer.” — Keith Townsend @CTOAdvisor“ username=“toprank“]

“I’m fine with calling it being a influencer, a thought leader, or whatever you want to call it. You have to put your thoughts out there. And sometimes putting your thoughts out there is the scariest part about becoming an influencer — but let’s just call it being known within your industry,“ Keith shared.

„Becoming an independent influencer is a little more difficult, because there’s not quite an established marketplace for the things that I do. So is going to the likes of TopRank Marketing or working directly with vendors to find out how do I help a vendor tell us their story, while keeping my authentic voice,“ Keith added.

“To stand out, don’t avoid those difficult conversations,” he also noted.

Watch Keith’s full interview in „Break Free B2B Marketing: Keith Townsend of The CTO Advisor on Bringing Value Through Friction

Dez Blanchfield of Sociaall

@dez_blanchfield
Founder, Sociaall Inc.

Dez Blanchfield

[bctt tweet=““If you’re a bank, be a bank, focus on being the best bank you can, and look for things that are going to disrupt you. But don’t try to be a phone company.” — Dez Blanchfield @dez_blanchfield“ username=“toprank“]

“When we have a conversation, we don’t just talk about influencer marketing. That’s a tiny segment of what we do. It’s taking an idea from a business plan and sales and marketing strategy in a go-to-market roadmap, around sales, marketing, comms, and business development, and mapping, ‚what’s the outcome you want?‘,“ Dez shared.

„What have you started to do sales investing in? Where are the gaps in that? How can we fill those gaps of digital social conversations, and how can we create these campaigns to drive those outcomes such that if and when someone has a pain point or a buying decision, we have ensured — through driving awareness, education engagement, in the form of influence — that you are top of mind and center of heart at that point of a buying decision,“ Dez added.

Watch, listen to or read Dez‘ complete interview by checking our the full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Dez Blanchfield of Sociaall on Joining the Conversation.“

Tamara McCleary of Thulium

@TamaraMcCleary
CEO, Thulium

Tamara McCleary

[bctt tweet=““Be clear about why you want to work with an influencer, what you hope to get out of working with the influencer.” — @TamaraMcCleary“ username=“toprank“]

„What is your purpose in using an influencer? Is your purpose to create brand awareness? Is your purpose to increase product sales? What is your purpose? Then, let’s reverse engineer from that and go, ‚Okay, who has the eyes and ears of the folks that are most interested in your product or service?‘,“ Tamara shared.

„Once we start calling people followers, or an audience, we start diminishing them — thinking somehow they don’t have any thought leadership. But the point of the matter is every single person has thought leadership, it’s just whether or not they’re building it by putting content out there,“ Tamara added.

„Be clear about why you want to work with an influencer, what you hope to get out of working with the influencer,“ Tamara suggested.

„If you don’t work with an organization that knows what they’re doing, that knows how to harness what that end result should be, knows what the influencer should be delivering to the organization, knows what the organization shouldn’t be asking the influencer, having a company like like TopRank to do that is important, because when I see organizations try to do influencer marketing themselves, it often fails. And then the big bummer for that is when it fails, they think influencer marketing fails. Influencer marketing hasn’t failed. It’s just the way you did it failed. You didn’t do it right,“ Tamara observed.

Watch Tamara’s full episode, „Break Free B2B Marketing: Tamara McCleary of Thulium on Visions of the Future and Doing No Harm.“

Nicole Brady of SAHM Reviews

@SahmReviews
Publisher, SAHM Reviews

Nicole Brady

[bctt tweet=““Do your thing, do what you’re good at. You want to start a business because you want to fill a niche. You have to be doing it because you’re passionate about it.” — Nicole Brady @SahmReviews“ username=“toprank“]

What makes influencer content powerful?

“Because it’s real. It’s someone that is sharing their opinions. It’s not scripted. It’s not a commercial,“ Nicole explained.

„Do your thing, do what you’re good at. You want to start a business because you want to fill a niche. You have to be doing it because you’re passionate about it,“ Nicole added.

“Find out what makes you different and what makes people want to talk to you, and then leverage it. Share those details, and create content around those details. As more and more people are on social media, being able to find those out-of-the-box environmental things that make you tick — that you might not have known — showing them off, that’s the way to do it.”

Watch, listen to or read Nicole’s full interview by checking our the full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Nicole Brady of SAHM Reviews on the Importance of Empathy in Reaching Your Niche.“

Eric Vanderburg of TCDI

@evanderburg
Vice President of Cybersecurity, TCDI

Eric Vanderburg

[bctt tweet=““Sometimes the influencer stuff can get almost like a back door sponsored content kind of thing, or an endorsement, and that’s something that we definitely try to avoid. Make sure the brand shares the values that you have.” — @vtamethodman“ username=“toprank“]

“Meeting other influencers in the space and learning how we all could better support one another, and how they were getting their messages out,“ has been a helpful approach, Eric noted.

„I’ve always seen this as bigger than any individual, so a lot of these collaborative works have been great,“ Eric added.

„Sometimes the influencer stuff can get almost like a back door sponsored content kind of thing, or an endorsement, and that’s something that we definitely try to avoid. Make sure the brand shares the values that you have,“ Eric also suggested.

Explore all of Eric’s episode in „Break Free B2B Marketing: Eric Vanderburg of TCDI on The Changing Cybersecurity Landscape.“

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey of Shipz

@bevictoryus
CEO, SHIPZ

Sarah Barnes-Humphrey

[bctt tweet=““Collaboration is the future of business. I think the only way forward is to really be able to understand what your colleagues in marketing, customer service, or procurement are going through on a day-to-day basis.” @bevictoryus“ username=“toprank“]

“There’s a lot of collaboration that can happen with supply chain internally, and a lot of different companies. I think we’re seeing more and more of that, which is exciting, especially for supply chain professionals, because they really want to work. They’re problem solvers, right? That’s who we are, as professionals — we are problem solvers. That’s what we do on a day-to-day basis,“ Sarah shared.

„We want to collaborate with the different departments internally, to really create that success for the company that that we’re working for,“ Sarah added.

„Collaboration is the future of business. I truly believe that. I think the only way forward is to really be able to understand what your colleagues in marketing, customer service, or procurement are going through, and what they do on a day-to-day basis,“ Sarah also noted.

Watch, listen to or read Sarah’s full interview by checking our the full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Sarah Barnes-Humphrey of Shipz and The Art of Consistent Change.“

Liam McIvor Martin of Time Doctor

Liam McIvor Martin
Co-Founder, Time Doctor

Liam McIvor Martin

[bctt tweet=““You really have to figure out a lane that you’re passionate about. Get super laser-focused on something.” — Liam McIvor Martin @vtamethodman“ username=“toprank“]

„If you’re like — man — I want to be the TikTok influencer. I want to learn how to get people ranked on TikTok — do you like TikTok? I kind of do, but not enough to be able to spend the next five years of my life talking about TikTok. You really have to figure out a lane that you’re passionate about,“ Liam urged.

„Get super laser-focused on something,“ Liam added.

Watch Liam’s full interview, „Break Free B2B Marketing: Liam McIvor Martin of Time Doctor on The Revolutionary Power of Remote Work.“

Oliver Christie of PertexaHealthTech

@OliverChristie
Chief Artificial Intelligence Officer, PertexaHealthTech

Oliver Christie

[bctt tweet=““I think the main way I’ve got to be where I am today is curiosity. I’ve been curious about the world, curious about technology — I’m really curious about people and how they act.” — Oliver Christie @OliverChristie“ username=“toprank“]

“I was curious. I wanted to know more. So I talked to a lot of people — people who had deep knowledge in one area, and I kept talking and I kept asking questions and discovering more and more and more. I think the main way I’ve got to be where I am today is curiosity. I’ve been curious about the world, curious about technology — I’m really curious about people and how they act,” Oliver explained.

„I’ve got to like what the project is about, what it’s trying to do. And I’ve also got to believe in the technology or the approach. I think without that, you’re selling something. You’re just selling something which you don’t believe in. And that’s not a reason to work,“ Oliver added.

Tune in to Oliver’s complete episode, „Break Free B2B Marketing: Oliver Christie on Making Life Better With AI.“

Tim Crawford of AVOA

@tcrawford
CIO Strategic Advisor, AVOA

Tim Crawford

[bctt tweet=““Decisions are not made based on a tweet, blog post, or webinar. Decisions are made based off of trust over an extended period of time. Knowing who you’re working with and having trust in that individual is incredibly important.” @tcrawford“ username=“toprank“]

“It’s shocking how the B2C definition of influencer kind of muddies the water of a B2B influencer, which is why I think we don’t use that term all that much in B2B, because we’re more focused on subject matter expert, thought leader, and authentic thinkers,“ Tim explained.

“I have also had to explain the difference between a B2C influencer and a B2B influencer. And sometimes that’s like pushing string uphill, because they think that the B2C model will apply to B2B, let’s face it, it’s unlike B2C,“ Tim added.

“Decisions are not made based on a tweet. A blog post. A webinar. These decisions are made based off of trust over an extended period of time. And so knowing who you’re working with and having trust in that individual is incredibly important,” Tim also noted.

Watch, listen to or read Tim’s complete interview by checking our the full blog post „Break Free B2B Marketing: Tim Crawford of AVOA on The New Normal.“

Kevin L. Jackson of GC GlobalNet

@Kevin_Jackson
CEO, GC GlobalNet

Kevin L Jackson

[bctt tweet=““Communication is key. You need to be able to communicate information effectively using the written, spoken, and visual word, and you have to be able to do that through multiple channels.” — Kevin Jackson @Kevin_Jackson“ username=“toprank“]

“Change is constant and change is accelerating. As an influencer or a subject matter expert, your ability to describe and explain the impact of information technology on business and key performance metrics is critical,“ Kevin explained.

„When you communicate, you need to use the industry’s vernacular, because that is what will make you unique. Communication is key. You need to be able to communicate information effectively using the written, spoken, and visual word, and you have to be able to do that through multiple channels — mass media, including social media. By being able to communicate well in those different forms across these different channels, your audience will grow rapidly and organically,” Kevin also noted.

„It’s really important to understand or accept this as a relationship. Not a short term experience, but a long term relationship where the influencer is a valued part of not just the marketing team, but the communications team, and the sales team. You really break free through collaboration and open dialogue with your colleagues and partners,” Kevin added.

Learn more from Kevin and see his full interview in „Break Free B2B Marketing: Kevin Jackson of GC GlobalNet on Cloud Computing.“

Reach New Heights With B2B Influencer Marketing

via GIPHY

These days successful B2B influencer marketing hardly ever follows the way it’s always been done, as all 12 of our subject matter experts have shown. We hope you’ll find the tactics and insights from Kevin, Tim, Oliver, Liam, Sarah, Eric, Nicole, Tamara, Dez, Keith, Minda, and Ramon inspiring and useful as you plan your upcoming B2B influencer marketing initiatives.

For even more insight from leading B2B marketers, be sure to also check out our Inside B2B Influence series of video interviews and podcasts, including the latest featuring Sarita Rao of AT&T, in „Inside B2B Influence: Sarita Rao of AT&T on Growing B2B Executive Influence with Social Media.“

Crafting award-winning B2B marketing with a skillful mixture of influence takes considerable time and effort, which is why many firms choose to work with a top digital marketing agency such as TopRank Marketing. Contact us and let’s talk about how we can help, as we’ve done for businesses ranging from LinkedIn, Dell and 3M to Adobe, Oracle, monday.com and others.

The post Unite with Might: 12 Top Ways Successful B2B Influencers Are Building Powerful Marketing Collaborations appeared first on B2B Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

Source:: toprankblog.com

Humanista – A human font

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“Humanista” is the name of an italic (chancery) font by Bertram Kaiser. The idea in this long-term project was to blend the boundaries between analogue calligraphic handwriting and designing a font digitally, while using all technical possibilities of modern type design.

All glyphs were originally written with a broadnib and then carefully vectorized, creating a human charme inside the font. In this design you will find influences from great calligraphy masters like Hermann Zapf or Werner Schneider. The pro version comes along with a big variety of alternate glyphs, initial and terminal forms, swash capitals and ligatures, which gives you the possibility of designing individual text layouts.

Inside the font you will also find a set of italic roman capitals plus fitting numerals and interpunction, which can be treated like a font itself. This font can be used for display sizes as well as for smaller textsizes like on Invitationcards or in magazines.

Source:: designmadeingermany.de

Höfelmeyer

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Das in Georgsmarienhütte (Landkreis Osnabrück) ansässige Maschinenbauunternehmen Höfelmeyer Waagen ist spezialisiert auf Anwendungen, Maschinen, Komponenten und Dienstleistungen im Bereich der Wiege-, Detektions-, Prozess- und Auszeichnungs­technologien.

Im Rahmen des Generationen­wechsels in der Geschäftsführung wurden Hierarchien abgebaut, Prozesse optimiert und ein starkes Führungsteam etabliert, um die Firma auch langfristig national und international erfolgreich am Markt zu platzieren.

Diese Entwicklung ging mit einer neuen Kultur und einem neuen Selbstverständnis einher, welches zusammen mit der Stay Golden nach strategischer Vorarbeit nun auch visuell im Rahmen eines neuen Corporate Design sichtbar wird. Das Designkonzept spielt mit dem Visualisieren der dynamischen, individuell anpassbaren Prozessabfolgen und assoziiert durch die Gewichtzu- bzw. abnahme der eingesetzten Balken den Wiegeprozess. Das Zusammenspiel der horizontal und vertikal ausgerichteten Elemente lässt eine eigene, sehr aktivierende Rhythmik entstehen, die ebenfalls im neuen Bildzeichen des Traditions­unternehmens verankert ist.

Das neue Corporate Design wird in den kommenden Wochen und Monaten auf alle relevanten Kontaktpunkte übertragen und so ein einheitlicher, zum Unternehmen passender Markenauftritt gewährleistet.

Source:: designmadeingermany.de